revieloutionne: (Default)
So, when I'm not mainlining Japanese kids' superhero shows, my media intake tends to be queer cinema, because it tends either to be awesome, or to be awesomely bad. (And even when it's just mediocre, the pandering tends to be towards those who like their eye candy male, so there's at least that.)

Those of you who follow my twitter feed will already know, though, that I just encountered the most miserable piece of shit to ever call itself a movie. I have suffered the Star Wars Holiday Special. This was ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE WORSE.

I really don't even know if I can put the horror into words. Although, those of you who follow my twitter feed saw my attempts throughout. While there are some understandable descriptions of some of the ways in which this film is awful there, it's by NO means comprehensive. Merely scratching the surface.

The worst part is... you know what, scratch what I was going to say. The worst part is ALL OF IT. (Except the one actor, who was at some point in post-production, someone tried to make changes to make us think the movie was about him. It only made things worse, because then the movie WASN'T, but they'd gone out of their way to make sure we were wondering "what if?")

I don't even know, y'all.

(Someday, I hope to inflict this on a mass of people so that I'm not the only person I know who has suffered it. So no, you're not getting the name of it. Nyah.)
revieloutionne: (Default)
So, when I'm not mainlining Japanese kids' superhero shows, my media intake tends to be queer cinema, because it tends either to be awesome, or to be awesomely bad. (And even when it's just mediocre, the pandering tends to be towards those who like their eye candy male, so there's at least that.)

Those of you who follow my twitter feed will already know, though, that I just encountered the most miserable piece of shit to ever call itself a movie. I have suffered the Star Wars Holiday Special. This was ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE WORSE.

I really don't even know if I can put the horror into words. Although, those of you who follow my twitter feed saw my attempts throughout. While there are some understandable descriptions of some of the ways in which this film is awful there, it's by NO means comprehensive. Merely scratching the surface.

The worst part is... you know what, scratch what I was going to say. The worst part is ALL OF IT. (Except the one actor, who was at some point in post-production, someone tried to make changes to make us think the movie was about him. It only made things worse, because then the movie WASN'T, but they'd gone out of their way to make sure we were wondering "what if?")

I don't even know, y'all.

(Someday, I hope to inflict this on a mass of people so that I'm not the only person I know who has suffered it. So no, you're not getting the name of it. Nyah.)
revieloutionne: (Default)
I've had the sequel to Sideline Secrets on my hard drive for a while, 'cause the first one was one of those awful movies with just enough unintentionally awesome moments (like anything involving the Awesome Topless Chick) to be worth it, but I didn't get around to watching it until just now.

One, there's a hell of a lot more cock in this one.

Two, IT'S FUCKING HILARIOUS. Like, it's objectively a better-made movie. There's only a couple lines of badly-looped dialogue, it doesn't run twice as long as it needs to, and even though most of it fails, the director does at least make some attempts at symbolism.

However: it's about an hour of disjointed scenes with the barest of patchwork plot actually moving things along. The movie expects you to accept that because we keep following the same characters that something is going on, but that's not true at all. For fuck's sake, what looks to be the main plot turns out to be dropped entirely as it's just the trigger for what turns out, in he last ten minutes at most, to be what's actually happening.

It comes out of fucking NOWHERE and it's AWESOMELY BAD. Depending on who comes up to Sandusky this summer it might be group viewing.
revieloutionne: (Default)
I've had the sequel to Sideline Secrets on my hard drive for a while, 'cause the first one was one of those awful movies with just enough unintentionally awesome moments (like anything involving the Awesome Topless Chick) to be worth it, but I didn't get around to watching it until just now.

One, there's a hell of a lot more cock in this one.

Two, IT'S FUCKING HILARIOUS. Like, it's objectively a better-made movie. There's only a couple lines of badly-looped dialogue, it doesn't run twice as long as it needs to, and even though most of it fails, the director does at least make some attempts at symbolism.

However: it's about an hour of disjointed scenes with the barest of patchwork plot actually moving things along. The movie expects you to accept that because we keep following the same characters that something is going on, but that's not true at all. For fuck's sake, what looks to be the main plot turns out to be dropped entirely as it's just the trigger for what turns out, in he last ten minutes at most, to be what's actually happening.

It comes out of fucking NOWHERE and it's AWESOMELY BAD. Depending on who comes up to Sandusky this summer it might be group viewing.
revieloutionne: (Default)
Just got back from seeing it. Most of the way through, I was all set to make an extensive post of my impressions of it and the changes they made (and how some of them actually work very well, including the change of Veidt's exact MO), and then the very very last parts of Antarctica happened, and I really can't be assed anymore because they totally missed what Veidt's failure actually was (though that certainly helped explain the random parallels they kept drawing between him and Hitler).
revieloutionne: (Default)
Just got back from seeing it. Most of the way through, I was all set to make an extensive post of my impressions of it and the changes they made (and how some of them actually work very well, including the change of Veidt's exact MO), and then the very very last parts of Antarctica happened, and I really can't be assed anymore because they totally missed what Veidt's failure actually was (though that certainly helped explain the random parallels they kept drawing between him and Hitler).
revieloutionne: (Default)
OHMAN.

This movie weirds me out. Because there were so many problems with it the last time I watched. And there still are. But. For some reason, coming right on the tail of Zeo, and having a familiarity with Kat and Tanya again (because Adam and Tommy were around long enough during the initial run of rangers that I didn't forget they existed in the way I did Kat and especially Tanya. Tanya is strangely one of my favorites now), the movie does work better. It's still weird.

Starting with the fact that they didn't bother pretending that the rangers were anything approaching high school age. If I didn't know that Turbo kept them in HS, I'd assume there was an unannounced timeskip between Zeo and this movie. I mean, there still quite obviously was one. Jason didn't go anywhere at the end of Zeo, and was getting involved with Emily. In this movie, he's been gone somewhere long enough that, textually, he and Kimberly being in Angel Grove is a surprise for the rangers, and subtextually, he and Kim are totally banging.

Speaking of which, Tommy clearly doesn't know. Because even with him being involved with Kat (and having moments with her throughout the movie), whoever wrote the script obviously believes him to still pine primarily for Kim. With Kat right there. It must suck magnificently to be her. (Especially because they were dressing her like she was about ten years over her age. Man.)

Now, what I managed to miss last time I was watching, because of the complete joke that is Justin, was that the rest of the rangers agree. Watch them during the scene where Justin hops out of the jeep at the ghost ship. Tell me they're not all thinking Zordon's off the deep end once Justin announces he's the new ranger. When he asks if it's cool or what, all he rest of the rangers have clearly gone with "or what."

And rightly so - whoever was in charge clearly thought that having a child ranger would help draw in younger viewers, because identification and all. Problem with that line of thought is, of course, that the initial child audience had no problem identifying with the first rangers. All of whom were teens. Yes, the rangers were getting older, as the replacements were always teh same age, but the getting older had nothing to do with whatever dropping viewership there might have been during Zeo. If it was anything, it was the epic standalone, no-long-term-plot-whatsoever form the season took, or maybe the mistreatment of Billy (we're not getting into that now. Possibly not ever).

But we wind up with Justin. Who is pretty much brainless energy, which has never been what a child thinks they are, accurate though the depiction may be. And boy is it.

But. The villains do manage to counteract the childishness that Justin brought with him. Hell, Divatox even gets to say "Hell's bells"! But mostly, it's the level of humor with them. While there's some borderline slapstick, it's got enough abuse behind it to keep an edge, and mostly it's all sorts of little things that I can't quite sum up here.

And Divatox's boobs.

But man. I cannot get past the tribe on that island. It's every ugly island native stereotype you could wish not to have, rolled up in one neat "they don't even have intelligible lines or motivation" package without any redeeming factor. Hell, during the big mook fight while Maligore is being released, they just run around and let the Pirhanatrons do the actual fighting.

There was no reason for them to be in the movie. And that just makes the cultural ignorance that much uglier.

And the Zord fight was a huge letdown. Especially because I think the transformation sequence was American-done. The miniature work there was amazing, and I was waiting for a Zord battle to match, but it doesn't. At all.

The plot was all over the place, but that's to be expected, really. Even if some parts had no real reason for happening, there was adequate plot justification. And the locations were gorgeous.

It's just a complete hot mess of a movie, and it totally deserves the Power Ranger name.

On to the series!
revieloutionne: (Default)
OHMAN.

This movie weirds me out. Because there were so many problems with it the last time I watched. And there still are. But. For some reason, coming right on the tail of Zeo, and having a familiarity with Kat and Tanya again (because Adam and Tommy were around long enough during the initial run of rangers that I didn't forget they existed in the way I did Kat and especially Tanya. Tanya is strangely one of my favorites now), the movie does work better. It's still weird.

Starting with the fact that they didn't bother pretending that the rangers were anything approaching high school age. If I didn't know that Turbo kept them in HS, I'd assume there was an unannounced timeskip between Zeo and this movie. I mean, there still quite obviously was one. Jason didn't go anywhere at the end of Zeo, and was getting involved with Emily. In this movie, he's been gone somewhere long enough that, textually, he and Kimberly being in Angel Grove is a surprise for the rangers, and subtextually, he and Kim are totally banging.

Speaking of which, Tommy clearly doesn't know. Because even with him being involved with Kat (and having moments with her throughout the movie), whoever wrote the script obviously believes him to still pine primarily for Kim. With Kat right there. It must suck magnificently to be her. (Especially because they were dressing her like she was about ten years over her age. Man.)

Now, what I managed to miss last time I was watching, because of the complete joke that is Justin, was that the rest of the rangers agree. Watch them during the scene where Justin hops out of the jeep at the ghost ship. Tell me they're not all thinking Zordon's off the deep end once Justin announces he's the new ranger. When he asks if it's cool or what, all he rest of the rangers have clearly gone with "or what."

And rightly so - whoever was in charge clearly thought that having a child ranger would help draw in younger viewers, because identification and all. Problem with that line of thought is, of course, that the initial child audience had no problem identifying with the first rangers. All of whom were teens. Yes, the rangers were getting older, as the replacements were always teh same age, but the getting older had nothing to do with whatever dropping viewership there might have been during Zeo. If it was anything, it was the epic standalone, no-long-term-plot-whatsoever form the season took, or maybe the mistreatment of Billy (we're not getting into that now. Possibly not ever).

But we wind up with Justin. Who is pretty much brainless energy, which has never been what a child thinks they are, accurate though the depiction may be. And boy is it.

But. The villains do manage to counteract the childishness that Justin brought with him. Hell, Divatox even gets to say "Hell's bells"! But mostly, it's the level of humor with them. While there's some borderline slapstick, it's got enough abuse behind it to keep an edge, and mostly it's all sorts of little things that I can't quite sum up here.

And Divatox's boobs.

But man. I cannot get past the tribe on that island. It's every ugly island native stereotype you could wish not to have, rolled up in one neat "they don't even have intelligible lines or motivation" package without any redeeming factor. Hell, during the big mook fight while Maligore is being released, they just run around and let the Pirhanatrons do the actual fighting.

There was no reason for them to be in the movie. And that just makes the cultural ignorance that much uglier.

And the Zord fight was a huge letdown. Especially because I think the transformation sequence was American-done. The miniature work there was amazing, and I was waiting for a Zord battle to match, but it doesn't. At all.

The plot was all over the place, but that's to be expected, really. Even if some parts had no real reason for happening, there was adequate plot justification. And the locations were gorgeous.

It's just a complete hot mess of a movie, and it totally deserves the Power Ranger name.

On to the series!
revieloutionne: (Default)
Okay, so I'd heard of Fosse for ages as I grew up - you don't have to be a theatre queen to have heard of him or even be able to say he's a choreographer - and even saw a bit of his choreography in high school when PBS aired their Great Performances recording of, well, Fosse. (It's a plotless show that's basically his best dances restaged with no context.) Being me-in-high-school, I didn't think much of it. I can be forgiven, I knew little of dance and even less of theatre (despite my involvement in two shows a year, half of which were musicals).

It wasn't until a couple years back, when I finally saw the film of Cabaret that I was able to see any of his work with a mind that could appreciate it, and it was blown. Every time I come back to that film, I have a better understanding of what movies are and can do, and how director functions, and every time I come back to that movie, I can look deeper, and every time I come back to that movie, I find no flaws, and every time I come back to that movie I learn something new about the art.

But that was him working with a story and music that were not originally his, no matter how much effort and adaptation he brought. It simply proved that he was an artist who could build his own great things from other people's work. Which is in no way an insult - that's exactly the job of a director, and damn did he do it.

And there's some more here about his choreography, which I first really appreciated with Cabaret as well, and then learned the style of in workshop, and then started trawling youtube for - see a couple posts back to see where that's led me lately, but that's another post entirely. It was that post a couple back, though, that finally tipped the scales on me seeking out All That Jazz, which I just finished watching. (With Portuguese subtitles because of the torrent. Heh.)

First off, TvTropes is right when they describe the first real scene as "proving Fosse can do A Chorus Line in six minutes with no dialogue." (Paraphrased, as that site isn't being friendly right now.)

But the rest of the movie is something else entirely, and when Fosse gets to build from the ground up, he blows my mind in an entirely different way. The man knows exactly what he's doing, and it was amazing to see the evolution of his techniques after Cabaret. The man had style and I'm amazed that I don't see more of it in movies that have come since.

Strangely, the first movie that comes to mind that even begins to feel like Fosse is Hedwig, and even then it's only a few scenes.

I need to find the rest of this man's filmography and marathon it hardcore. Who's up for it? I feel like this should be a group event.
revieloutionne: (Default)
Okay, so I'd heard of Fosse for ages as I grew up - you don't have to be a theatre queen to have heard of him or even be able to say he's a choreographer - and even saw a bit of his choreography in high school when PBS aired their Great Performances recording of, well, Fosse. (It's a plotless show that's basically his best dances restaged with no context.) Being me-in-high-school, I didn't think much of it. I can be forgiven, I knew little of dance and even less of theatre (despite my involvement in two shows a year, half of which were musicals).

It wasn't until a couple years back, when I finally saw the film of Cabaret that I was able to see any of his work with a mind that could appreciate it, and it was blown. Every time I come back to that film, I have a better understanding of what movies are and can do, and how director functions, and every time I come back to that movie, I can look deeper, and every time I come back to that movie, I find no flaws, and every time I come back to that movie I learn something new about the art.

But that was him working with a story and music that were not originally his, no matter how much effort and adaptation he brought. It simply proved that he was an artist who could build his own great things from other people's work. Which is in no way an insult - that's exactly the job of a director, and damn did he do it.

And there's some more here about his choreography, which I first really appreciated with Cabaret as well, and then learned the style of in workshop, and then started trawling youtube for - see a couple posts back to see where that's led me lately, but that's another post entirely. It was that post a couple back, though, that finally tipped the scales on me seeking out All That Jazz, which I just finished watching. (With Portuguese subtitles because of the torrent. Heh.)

First off, TvTropes is right when they describe the first real scene as "proving Fosse can do A Chorus Line in six minutes with no dialogue." (Paraphrased, as that site isn't being friendly right now.)

But the rest of the movie is something else entirely, and when Fosse gets to build from the ground up, he blows my mind in an entirely different way. The man knows exactly what he's doing, and it was amazing to see the evolution of his techniques after Cabaret. The man had style and I'm amazed that I don't see more of it in movies that have come since.

Strangely, the first movie that comes to mind that even begins to feel like Fosse is Hedwig, and even then it's only a few scenes.

I need to find the rest of this man's filmography and marathon it hardcore. Who's up for it? I feel like this should be a group event.
revieloutionne: (Default)
So. Kings Island was epic. There were pictures of GRATE LULZ, and we impressed the photobooth people at son of Beast with our mad Apples to Apples skillz. Phil got cat ears.

HOWEVER. On the way in the last day, we went a slightly different route, and passed a drive-in theater not too far from Oxford. They were showing a Goonies/Grease double feature. I was all "cool, drive-in!"

Thursday, I drive Erick into Hamilton for McDonalds brainwashing training, and we pass the place. THIS WEEKEND ONLY: TRIPLE FEATURE OF THE DARK NIGHT/THE INCREDIBLE HULK/IRON MAN.

I go to King (for my computer is dead, and I don't get a new one until my trip home Sunday at the soonest. I'ma have a laptop, guise!) and interninja up the website for the place. EIGHT DOLLARS.

It was epic.

Dark Night was by far the best of the three, despite treading thematic territory done in comics, and even comic movies OVER NINE THOUSAND times. I kept thinking it was ending and then it kept going, but in a good way. Also, somewhere relatively near the end is the perfect place for "He's the Goddamn Batman." trufax. I pretend it was actually said.

Incredible Hulk was a decent movie, but greatly suffered for its placement between these two. It moved quickly, though. I glanced down at my dashboard and suddenly it was an hour into the movie and I thought it was maybe half that.

Iron Man is definitely the funnest, and most relevant to modern tiems. And, I think, the most human. I'd say it was the best, but there's just something about Dark Night that makes it much better than the sum of its parts. (I know that that something is not that Gordon looks like Ned Flanders.)

Also: DRIVE-IN ITSELF WAS AMAAAAAAZING. It needs to be After Anime sometime. Probably soon in the year, 'cause I wouldn't be surprised if they periodically bump showtime forward as the sun sets sooner. Also, Firefox doesn't think showtime is a word, WTF.
revieloutionne: (Default)
So. Kings Island was epic. There were pictures of GRATE LULZ, and we impressed the photobooth people at son of Beast with our mad Apples to Apples skillz. Phil got cat ears.

HOWEVER. On the way in the last day, we went a slightly different route, and passed a drive-in theater not too far from Oxford. They were showing a Goonies/Grease double feature. I was all "cool, drive-in!"

Thursday, I drive Erick into Hamilton for McDonalds brainwashing training, and we pass the place. THIS WEEKEND ONLY: TRIPLE FEATURE OF THE DARK NIGHT/THE INCREDIBLE HULK/IRON MAN.

I go to King (for my computer is dead, and I don't get a new one until my trip home Sunday at the soonest. I'ma have a laptop, guise!) and interninja up the website for the place. EIGHT DOLLARS.

It was epic.

Dark Night was by far the best of the three, despite treading thematic territory done in comics, and even comic movies OVER NINE THOUSAND times. I kept thinking it was ending and then it kept going, but in a good way. Also, somewhere relatively near the end is the perfect place for "He's the Goddamn Batman." trufax. I pretend it was actually said.

Incredible Hulk was a decent movie, but greatly suffered for its placement between these two. It moved quickly, though. I glanced down at my dashboard and suddenly it was an hour into the movie and I thought it was maybe half that.

Iron Man is definitely the funnest, and most relevant to modern tiems. And, I think, the most human. I'd say it was the best, but there's just something about Dark Night that makes it much better than the sum of its parts. (I know that that something is not that Gordon looks like Ned Flanders.)

Also: DRIVE-IN ITSELF WAS AMAAAAAAZING. It needs to be After Anime sometime. Probably soon in the year, 'cause I wouldn't be surprised if they periodically bump showtime forward as the sun sets sooner. Also, Firefox doesn't think showtime is a word, WTF.
revieloutionne: (Default)
Okay, so Shock Treatment is the lesser-known follow-up to The Rocky Horror Picture Show. It's a sequel in that it follows Brad and Janet when they return to Denton, but O'Brien has pretty much, if not precisely, stated that it wasn't his ideal sequel and it got made 'cause it's what could get made, basically.

Much of Rocky Horror fandom hates it.

I LESS THAN THREE THE SHIT OUT OF IT.

It's pure, empty entertainment (except the parts that aren't), and it doesn't ever pretend to be anything more. And the music is actually quite good. And in the middle of being schlocky fun, it throws in some things that actually have, y'know, meaning and artistic merit, if you're able to notice.

Oddly enough, this is exactly what Rocky Horror is without the audience participation.

Plus, there's a song that's totally about how the lead singer of this band is gay and hated being closeted, and it goes right over the studio audience/townspeople's heads. It's brilliant.

Also brilliant is that O'Brien called that life would be televised and television life loooooong before that happened. (We're kind of moving out of that age already, as the internet becomes life, but that's a story for another time.)

In all, I reccomend it, but please, take it for nothing more than it is, or you're likely to be dissappointed.
revieloutionne: (Default)
Okay, so Shock Treatment is the lesser-known follow-up to The Rocky Horror Picture Show. It's a sequel in that it follows Brad and Janet when they return to Denton, but O'Brien has pretty much, if not precisely, stated that it wasn't his ideal sequel and it got made 'cause it's what could get made, basically.

Much of Rocky Horror fandom hates it.

I LESS THAN THREE THE SHIT OUT OF IT.

It's pure, empty entertainment (except the parts that aren't), and it doesn't ever pretend to be anything more. And the music is actually quite good. And in the middle of being schlocky fun, it throws in some things that actually have, y'know, meaning and artistic merit, if you're able to notice.

Oddly enough, this is exactly what Rocky Horror is without the audience participation.

Plus, there's a song that's totally about how the lead singer of this band is gay and hated being closeted, and it goes right over the studio audience/townspeople's heads. It's brilliant.

Also brilliant is that O'Brien called that life would be televised and television life loooooong before that happened. (We're kind of moving out of that age already, as the internet becomes life, but that's a story for another time.)

In all, I reccomend it, but please, take it for nothing more than it is, or you're likely to be dissappointed.
revieloutionne: (Default)
Okay, so yeah I'm a little gay fanboy of Christopher Isherwood, but still:

This is totally a must see. The man is amazing, and if the trailer's any indication, the film's done amazingly, too. At the very least, it's going to turn a man who, for a lot of people who've read up on Isherwood, only exists as "that 30-years-younger boy he dated for forever" into a real person.

Sweet.
revieloutionne: (Default)
Okay, so yeah I'm a little gay fanboy of Christopher Isherwood, but still:

This is totally a must see. The man is amazing, and if the trailer's any indication, the film's done amazingly, too. At the very least, it's going to turn a man who, for a lot of people who've read up on Isherwood, only exists as "that 30-years-younger boy he dated for forever" into a real person.

Sweet.
revieloutionne: (Default)
So. I've been meaning to see Psycho Beach Party for ages. I've been interested for at least a year, finally downloaded and burned the thing a few months ago... finally got 'round to watching it tonight.

It is amazing beyond my wildest dreams.

I thought it was going to be a bad 60s surfer movie, made a few years ago, with more modern thoughts about sex sprinkled in. With the intentional bad and all, and it would be good in spite of that.

No, it was just flat-out a bad 60s surfer movie, made a few years ago, with more modern thoughts about sex sprinked in. It was good because of that.

That's right, it's not any sort of send-up of bad 60s surfer movies, it just is one, and it doesn't apologize, and it certainly doesn't update the "surfing" effects. And it actually works as a thriller. You've got the obvious-therefore-not-but-maybe-anyway candidate, and then about four other legitimate possibilities and then the reveal throws you a bit, but the film has such infectious glee in what it is that even though it doesn't quite make sense, it's not like anything else did either, so you go with it.

Plus? There's a dance battle to die for. (Even if that is, like, the only time nobody does.) (Okay, there are other deathless times, too. But still.)



Oh, and how I wish I could have seen the original off-Broadway play of it. It's from that amazing bygone era when all you needed for a theatrical movement was a performance space, a man or two in drag, bright colors, cheap tickets, a bit of enthusiam, a lot of sex, some drugs, and a lack of funds. (Upon further consideration, the last two items may be one.)
revieloutionne: (Default)
So. I've been meaning to see Psycho Beach Party for ages. I've been interested for at least a year, finally downloaded and burned the thing a few months ago... finally got 'round to watching it tonight.

It is amazing beyond my wildest dreams.

I thought it was going to be a bad 60s surfer movie, made a few years ago, with more modern thoughts about sex sprinkled in. With the intentional bad and all, and it would be good in spite of that.

No, it was just flat-out a bad 60s surfer movie, made a few years ago, with more modern thoughts about sex sprinked in. It was good because of that.

That's right, it's not any sort of send-up of bad 60s surfer movies, it just is one, and it doesn't apologize, and it certainly doesn't update the "surfing" effects. And it actually works as a thriller. You've got the obvious-therefore-not-but-maybe-anyway candidate, and then about four other legitimate possibilities and then the reveal throws you a bit, but the film has such infectious glee in what it is that even though it doesn't quite make sense, it's not like anything else did either, so you go with it.

Plus? There's a dance battle to die for. (Even if that is, like, the only time nobody does.) (Okay, there are other deathless times, too. But still.)



Oh, and how I wish I could have seen the original off-Broadway play of it. It's from that amazing bygone era when all you needed for a theatrical movement was a performance space, a man or two in drag, bright colors, cheap tickets, a bit of enthusiam, a lot of sex, some drugs, and a lack of funds. (Upon further consideration, the last two items may be one.)
revieloutionne: (Default)
Hairspray first: Sadly, I spent a significant bit of my workday today contemplating Hairspray and various thematic stuffs, and it's definitely more resonant and subversive than I thought even yesterday. Mostly, however, I have to wonder this: How, exactly, do you wind up with a TV station in the early/mid sixties progressive enough to hire a woman as station manager but also completely and totally "black people are scum!"? I could understand Velma having that opinion while her boss was more "Well, the audience won't like it..." and not having the balls to act, what with women's rights generally moving along faster than other minorities'.

And: something else that I've forgotten, because DEATHLY HALLOWS happened between work and now.

Spoilers follow )
revieloutionne: (Default)
Hairspray first: Sadly, I spent a significant bit of my workday today contemplating Hairspray and various thematic stuffs, and it's definitely more resonant and subversive than I thought even yesterday. Mostly, however, I have to wonder this: How, exactly, do you wind up with a TV station in the early/mid sixties progressive enough to hire a woman as station manager but also completely and totally "black people are scum!"? I could understand Velma having that opinion while her boss was more "Well, the audience won't like it..." and not having the balls to act, what with women's rights generally moving along faster than other minorities'.

And: something else that I've forgotten, because DEATHLY HALLOWS happened between work and now.

Spoilers follow )

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